Works in Progress

Works in Progress. Magazine of the Philadelphia Folklore Project. Published since 1987, 1-2x/year. Subscriptions are a benefit of membership ($25/year). Members also receive news mailings. Call 215.726.1106 for information. Selected past issues available at $2-$8. Subscribe online.


CURRENT ISSUE

26:1/2 (Summer 2014) 32 pp. $12 (View PDF / 19.2 MB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • Honoring Ancestors: Notes from an Exhibition, p. 4
  • Introducing the Liberian Women's Chorus for Change by Toni Shapiro-Phim, p8
  • Music can turn your heart around by Ruth M. Stone, p12
  • Notes from FACTS by Debora Kodish, p16
  • Annsumane Sillá & Lela Aisha Jones by Toni Shapiro-Phim, p18
  • Bangladeshi American youth: migration, memory & visibility by Fariha Khan, p20



PAST IssueS

We share these issues to bring wider attention to significant local traditions and the artists and community members who keep them vital. Download them for free here, but also consider joining or making a donation to support their work, and ours. Email us, too, if you find these materials useful, or to share your responses.

25:1/2 (Summer 2012) 32 pp. $12 (View PDF / 2.1 MB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • Kathryn Morgan (1919 - 2010). By Debora Kodish and Marilyn White, p. 4
  • The ancestors are alive as long as they are remembered. By Linda Goss, p. 6
  • Yvette Smalls: Beauty is as beauty does. Interviewed by Caroliese Frink-Reed, p. 8
  • Cultural Exchange, p. 12
  • Announcing a new Community Supported Art program, p. 16
  • We Cannot Keep Silent. By Helen Gym, Ellen Somekawa, and Joan May Cordova, p. 18
  • Midweek hairdo. By Katrina Hazzard-Donald, p. 22
  • Isaac Maefield: Art empowers. Interviewed by Debora Kodish, p. 24
  • PFP turns 25, p. 30

24:1/2 (Spring 2011) 32 pp. $12 (View PDF / 2.7 MB)


23:1/2 (Summer/fall 2010) 32 pp. $12 (View PDF / 4.5 MB)

Works in Progress

22:1/2 (Summer/fall 2009) 32 pp. $12 (View PDF / 17.2 MB)

Works in Progress

21:1/2 (Summer/fall 2008) 32 pp. $12 (View PDF / 875 KB)


20:1/2 (Winter 2007) 32 pp. $8 (View PDF / 5.4 MB)

19:1/3 (Winter 2006) 36 pp. $8 (View PDF / 2.2 MB)

19:1/2 (Spring 2006) 32 pp. $8 (View PDF / 720 KB)

18:2/3 (Summer 2005) 32 pp. $6(View PDF/2.9MB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • "I choose to stay here." By Debora Kodish and members of Community Leadership Institute, p. 4
  • "We are here to make changes:" pleñero Joaquin Rivera. By Elizabeth Sayre, p. 8
  • Acrobatics and freedom: sepak takraw in a South Philadelphia park. By Bill Westerman, p. 10
  • The dance is an offering: Ollin Yolitzli Calmecac. By Kay Turner, p. 12
  • We shall not be moved: Thomas B. Morton's photographs of 30 years of ODUNDE. p. 14
  • Arabic song, flamenco footwork: Herencia Arabe . By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 18
  • Folk arts and multicultural education: notes on a folklore project program. By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 22

18:1 (Winter 2005) 24 pp. $6 (View PDF/890 KB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • Imagining Louise Madison: remembering African American women dancers. By Germaine Ingram, p. 4
  • Self-knowledge. By Kathryn L. Morgan, p. 8
  • Waking up the people. By Linda Goss, p. 10
  • Telling stories my whole life. By Thelma Shelton Robinson, p. 12

17:3 (Summer 2004) 24 pp. $6 (View PDF/652 KB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • "Walking on solid ground" and the history of Philadelphia's Chinatown. By Debora Kodish, p. 4
  • Reflections on the serpent's tail. By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 8
  • Kulu Mele: legacy and transnational practice. By Barbara L. Hampton, p. 12
  • Making music: Mogauwane Mahloele, Tito Rubio, John Wilkie. Edited by Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 16

17:1/2 (Summer/Fall 2003) Special "Women's Music Project" issue. 48 pp. $6 (View PDF/1.2 MB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • About the Women's Music Project. By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 4
  • The drum was my introduction to my life: Nana Korantemaa Ayeboafo. By Elizabeth Sayre, p. 8
  • This is not a dress rehearsal: NANIKHA, p. 12
  • Knocking on the spirit door. By Omomola Iyabunmi, p. 16
  • Cooking up a mess of agit-prop. By Eric Joselyn, p. 18
  • Walking on solid ground. By Shuyuan Li, p. 24
  • We shall not be moved. By Lois Fernandez, p. 28
  • Total praise: preserving the hymn singing tradition. By Shawn P. Saunders, p. 30
  • Esta en mis venas: three latina musicians. By Elizabeth Sayre, p. 32

16:1/2 (Fall/Winter 2002) Special "Philly Dance Africa" issue. 32 pp. $4 (View PDF/2.1 MB)

  • From the editors. By Debora Kodish and Toni Shapiro-Phim , p. 3
  • Welcome. By Samuel Quartey, p. 4
  • A Ga outdooring. By Barbara L. Hampton, p. 6
  • Ione Nash and Kule Mele African Dance Ensemble. By Katrina Hazzard-Donald, p. 10
  • To be young, gifted and Black. By Shawn P. Saunders, p. 14
  • African dance. By Kariamu Welsh, p. 16

15:1/2 (Summer 2002) Special "Dance Happens Here" issue. 32 pp. $4 (View PDF /1.3 MB)

  • From the guest editor. Dance journeys: movement vs. silence. By Toni Shapiro-Phim , p. 3
  • As the chaos of the world is knocking on our door: an interview with Matthew Hart of Spiral Q Puppet Theater. By Toni-Shapiro-Phim, p, 4
  • A procession for the new year. [Khmer trot procession in South Philadelphia] By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 8
  • On flamenco. By Anna Rubio, p. 12
  • Aqui Estoy. By Toni Shapiro-Phim, p. 14
  • Kormassa Bobo [Liberian dancer]. By Cory W. Thorne, p. 16
  • Reconnecting with tradition [African American social dance]. By Shawn P. Saunders, p. 18
  • Lithuanian folk arts journey. By Jen Cox, p. 20
  • PFP traveling exhibitions and books, p. 28
  • Look forward and carry on the past order form, p. 30

14:1/2 (Summer 2001) Special "Asian Art Happens Here" issue. 36 pp. $4 (View PDF / 2.5 MB)

  • From the editors. By Debora Kodish and Deborah Wei , p. 3
  • Sites of struggle: bringing folklore and social change into the classroom. By Debora Kodish and Debora Wei, p. 5
  • I didn't dance after I left Changsha. By Oliver Nie, p. 10
  • The story of Ki-Wook Kim. By Ju-Yeon Ryu, p. 14
  • Chinatown without lion dancers would be a community filled with regret. By Sifu Cheung Shu Pui, p. 18
  • The deep void in my heart has been filled: Beijing Opera in Philadelphia. By Juan Xu, p. 24
  • You cannot lose your spirit. By Leendavy Koung, p. 26

13:1/2 (Winter 2000) Special "Folk Arts of Social Change" issue. 32 pp. $4 (View PDF / 3.3 MB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Blood Stains. By William Westerman, pp. 3-5, 28
  • Reclaiming a tradition: mid-autumn festival in Philadelphia's Chinatown. By Deborah Wei, pp. 6-7, 26-27
  • La Virgen de Guadalupe and stuggles for justice in Chester County. By Miguel Diaz-Barriga and Luis Tlaseca, pp. 8-9, 27
  • Folk Arts of Social Change: excepts from an exhibition. Exhibition text panels, photographs and labels, curated by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 10-21
  • Folk Arts of Social Change: curator's selection. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 22-25, 27-29
  • Traveling exhibitions, pp. 30-31

12:2/3 (Summer 1999) Special Caribbean folk arts issue. 28 pp. $4 (View PDF /2.2 MB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Caribbean folk artists in Philadelphia [Edwin Arocho, mask maker; Terrence Cameron, steel drum-maker; Confesor Melendez, cuatro-maker]. By Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 3-7
  • Bending wire in Philadelphia: the carnival arts of Bobby DeSouza and Cecil Griffith. By Philip Scher, pp. 8-9, 22
  • "To speak up and tell the truth": interview with Jean Hunt [activist interviews]
  • Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 10-13, 20-21
  • Help us build "Folk Arts of Social Change," pp. 14-15
  • David Acosta: "Change was in the air" [activist interviews]. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Teresa Jaynes, pp.16-19, 23-24
  • PFP videos, traveling exhibitions and books, pp. 25-27

12:1 (Spring 1999) 28 pp. $4

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • "African dance, that's my job:" Congolese dancers and drummers in Philadelphia. By Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 3-5, 26-27
  • Bertha Waters and her daughters: "Our children told us to put our feet where our mouth was!" [activists interviews]. Excerpts from interviews with Bertha Water, Cynthia Waters-Spaulding and Linda Richardson by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 6-9, 18-19, 22-23
  • Nigerian music and dance: Twins 7-7 of Nigeria. By Stacey Ford and Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 10-11
  • Blanche Epps' memory dolls. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 12-13, 20
  • Learning the rhythms of life [about African dance]. Excerpts from a recorded discussion by Kwesi Yankah and Katrina Hazzard-Donald, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 14-17, 21
  • Traveling exhibitions and books, pp. 24-25

11:2/3 (Spring 1998) 32 pp. $4

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Rennie Harris: "Dancing the art of living." Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Joan Huckstep, pp. 3-5
  • Elaine Hoffman Watts: "Girls don't play drums." Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 6-7, 24
  • "My father never played for me:" Joe Borock. By Jackie Borock, pp. 8-9, 25
  • Kiyoshi Kuromiya: "Building up our courage and our experience" [activists interviews]. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 10-13
  • Pang Xiong Sirirathasuk Sikoun: "You only have to worry about bears and tigers" [Hmong artist experiences]. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Deborah Wei, pp. 14-17, 25
  • Phua Xiong: "I had a different name when I was born..." [Hmong experiences]. Excerpts from interviews recorded and edited by Deborah Wei, pp. 18-21
  • Self-taught painters from the PFP collection [Aaron Birnbaum, Floretta Emma Warfel, Ken Grimes]. By Jack L. Lindsey, pp. 22-23
  • Artists in Exile: a documentary photography exhibition by Thomas B. Morton. By Debora Kodish, Mogauwane Mahoele, and others. From interviews with Teresa Jaynes and Debora Kodish. pp. 27-28
  • Traveling exhibitions and books, pp. 29-30
  • Upcoming events, p. 31

11:1 (Winter 1997) Special African social dance issue. 28 pp. $4

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Here comes Philly Dance Africa [artist biographies]. By Stacey Ford and Debora Kodish, pp. 3-9
  • Africa's new traditional dancing. By Katrina Hazzard-Donald, pp. 10-11
  • "Philadelphia, Muntiye!" (Listen up, Philadelphia!): Nii Armah Hammond is talking [Ga drummer]. By Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 12-13, 23
  • Die Jess Sah Bi, a very modern traditionalist [Guro kolon player]. By Elizabeth Sayre, pp. 14-17
  • Personal reflections on Haitian music. By Lois Wilcken and Frisner Augustin, pp. 18-19
  • Bill and Miriam Crawford: "Freedom was my badge" [activists interviews]. Recorded and transcribed by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 20-22
  • A gathering of warriors (The steel drum and our children). By Germaine Ingram, pp. 24-25
  • Upcoming events, p. 26

10:2/3 (Summer/fall 1997) Special 10th Anniversary issue. 32 pp. $4 (View PDF /1.8 MB)

  • From the editor. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Happy 10th birthday: where were you in January 1987? By Debora Kodish, p. 3-9
  • Painted women: Rashmi Jhaveri's henna arts. By Teresa Jaynes, pp. 10-13
  • Carved birds and flowers: Chia Kue's edible art. By Teresa Jaynes, pp. 14-15
  • "I do not do recitals:" Ione Nash, dancer and teacher. By Debora Kodish, pp. 16-17
  • "Where there is music, there is dance:" African social dance in Philadelphia. By Stacey E. Ford, pp. 18-19, 27
  • "Tell the story to the children:" William Still and the Still family reunion. By William Westerman, pp. 20-23
  • Facing down a death squad: a labor organizer in Honduras [activists interviews]. Excerpts from interviews with Mike Finley and Denys Everingham, by Teresa Jaynes, pp. 24-26
  • Exhibitions and books, pp. 28-29
  • Upcoming events, p. 30

9:3/10:1 (Fall 1996/Winter 1997) 32 pp. $3

  • From the editor / to our readers. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Remembering Leab Lenorra Koung (1976-1996). By Debora Kodish, p. 3
  • "My paintings will not die:" Frito Bastien, Haitian artist in exile. By Jennifer Michael, pp. 4-7
  • "An actress since I was born:" Chayale Ash, Yiddish theater artist. By Janice Cohen and Debora Kodish, pp. 8-9
  • "Singing is like freedom of speech:" Hawa Moore, Liberian performing artist. By Jennifer Michael, pp. 10-13
  • Cambodian folk tales, as told by local Philadelphia storytellers. By Meas Chea, Bory Kouch, Chiny Ky, Touch San and Chamroeun Yin, edited by Chiny Ky ands Debora Kodish, pp. 14-23
  • "Plenty of Good Women Dancers" exhibit opens, pp. 24-25
  • Our new children's book punctures stereotypes, pp. 26-27
  • Traveling exhibitions, and books, pp. 28-29
  • Upcoming events, p. 30

9:1/2 (Winter 1996) 24 pp. $3

  • Who defines Indian artists? Background and some considerations. By Troy Richardson, pp. 2-5
  • Native women singers / history. By Pura Fe, pp. 6-7
  • Negotiating pitfalls and possibilities: presenting folk arts in the schools. By Debora Kodish and William Westerman, pp. 8-11
  • "I don't care to hide anything:" Chamroeun Yin [Cambodian dancer]. Transcribed from interviews by Prolung Khan Ngin, edited by Chiny Ky and Debora Kodish, pp. 12-15
  • "Why do you guys dance like that?" conversations with Asian American teenagers. Edited from interviews by Catzie Vilayphonh, Ty Sao, and René Marquez, with Debbie Wei, Teresa Jaynes and Debora Kodish, pp. 16-19
  • Some Cambodian women weavers in Philadelphia. By Prolung Ngin based on interviews by herself and Jennifer Harris , pp. 20-21
  • Announcing traveling folklife exhibitions, pp. 22-23
  • Calendar of events, p. 23

8:3 (Summer/fall 1995) Special "Art Happens Here" issue. 24 pp. $3

  • Art Happens Here: an introduction. By Debora Kodish and Teresa Jaynes, pp. 2-3
  • "You have completed a circle:" Baba Crowder in Ghana [African American percussionist]. By Baba Ibikunle Bey and Debora Kodish, pp. 4-5
  • "All these things are linked:" Mogauwane Mahloele [South African musician]. By Teresa Jaynes, pp. 6-7
  • Documenting graffiti. By Sandra Andino, pp. 8-9, 15
  • Keep it real. By Dan Polanco, pp. 10, 15
  • Talking about graffiti: excerpts from a discussion at Taller Puertorriqueno. Transcribed from multiple speakers, pp. 16-19
  • "Believe me, it was a cultural haven at the time:" coming up in Point Breeze. Transcribed from multiple speakers, pp. 2-21
  • Odunde: twenty years on South Street [African American community festival]. Transcribed from multiple speakers and edited by Alyson Littman, pp. 22-23

8:2 (February 1995) Special "Stepping in Time" issue [African American tap dance]. 44 pp. $4

  • Setting the record straight: an introduction to "Stepping in Time." By Germaine Ingram and Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3 [revised from 7:2/3 (1994) 8-13]
  • Performers' biographies, pp. 4-13
  • Some beginnings and breaks: stories from virtuoso veteran dancers. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 14-17 [revised from 6:3/7:1 (1993) 2-5]
  • "Just playin' from the heart:" Henry Meadows and the rhythms of South Philadelphia. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 18-20
  • "Not everyone can be in a show:" John Hart. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, p. 21
  • "The real untold stories of tap:" African American women dancers. By Germaine Ingram and Debora Kodish, pp. 22-27 [revised from 7:2/3 (1994) 8-13]
  • "Staging the shows, all the way down the line:" Hortense Allen Jordan and Libby Spencer. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 28-31
  • "Tryin' to get my knowledge together:" Women entertainers in the business and on the road. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 32-37
  • "You had your own style:" tricks of the tap dance trade and how you learned them. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 38-41 [same as 8:1 (1994) 12-17]
  • Stepping in Time: credits, p. 42

8:1 (Winter 1994) 24 pp. $3

  • "We are speaking for those ancestors whose stories were not allowed to be heard:" storyteller Charlotte Blake Alston. By Teresa Jaynes and Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • "I've raised more children than I've brought into the world:" culture and community in West Philadelphia. By Teresa Jaynes, pp. 4-7
  • Gospel music from the grassroots. By Cassandra Graves, pp. 8-11
  • Coming up dancing: tricks of the tap dance trade and how you learned them. Excerpts from transcribed interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 12-17
  • "When they hit the light, they shone like diamonds:" memories of lakhon bassac Cambodian folk opera]. Excerpts from interview with Siden Veal, recorded by Bill Westerman, pp. 18-19
  • The story of Neang Domra and Preah Mohaosot. By Koung Paeng, as told to Leendavy Koung
  • Kai Akwei-Bey, photographer, p. 22
  • Upcoming events, news, and new publications, p. 23

7:2/3 (Fall 1994) 24 pp. $3 OUT OF PRINT

  • From hucklebuck to hip-hop: ODUNDE goes dancing. By Lois Fernandez and Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • Tell us how you dance..., p. 3
  • "I don't ever remember a time when we didn't dance:" excerpts from interviews, pp. 4-7
  • "The real untold stories of tap:" African American women dancers. By Germaine Ingram and Debora Kodish, pp. 8-13
  • African dance in Philadelphia. By Benita Binta Brown, pp. 14-19
  • "There's nobody who's ever lived on the face of this earth who wasn't at one time enslaved:" Lee Carter's Underground Railroad paintings. By Bill Westerman, pp. 20-23
  • Recognizing cultural barriers to justice in greater Philadelphia. By William Westerman, pp. 24-26
  • News, pp. 26-27

6:3/7:1 (Winter 1993) Special double issue. 24 pp. $3

  • Some beginnings and breaks: first notes from the Philadelphia Tap Initiative. By Debora Kodish, pp. 2-5
  • Ethnographic perspectives on a Cambodian arts class in Philadelphia. By Bill Westerman, pp. 6-9
  • Behind the letter of the law: culture and the work of the public defender. By Bill Westerman, pp. 10-13
  • Samuel Yellin Metalworks: a folklife perspective on a preservation project. By Michael J. Chiarappa and Ralph Muldrow, pp. 14-15
  • Community-based rhythms against violence: African American marching units in Philadelphia. By Benita Binta Brown with Jennnifer Michael, pp. 16-21
  • Hal Taylor, 1921-1993: a remembrance. By Karen Buchholz, pp. 22-23

6:2 (Spring 1993) Special ODUNDE issue. 16 pp. $3

  • Introduction: the ODUNDE African American festival, its roots and relations. By Lois Fernandez and Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • An ODUNDE portfolio: photographer's statement. By Thomas B. Morton, p. 3
  • Origins: why we shall not be moved. By Lois Fernandez, pp. 4-5
  • Testimonies. Excerpts from recorded interviews, edited by Debora Kodish, pp. 6-7
  • "The right to assemble:" African American uses of public space. By Karen Buchholz, pp. 8-9
  • The drum preferred. By Jerrily McGregory, pp.10-13
  • Cultural incubation: Sydney King's dance school and its legacies. By Karen Warrington, pp. 14-15

6:1 (Winter 1992/3) 16 pp. $4

  • Boun pi mai: customs of the Lao New Year. By Chanthavy Thamphya and Jennifer Michael, pp. 2-3
  • "The heart lasts longer than appearances:" Hmong kwv txhiaj (courting song) at New Years. By Yang Blianghheng Lo, Pang Xiong Sirirathasuk and Jennifer Michael, with assistance from T-Bee Lo. Khue Vang and Chakaphong Sirirathasuk, pp. 4-6
  • New Year issues. By Debora Kodish, p.7
  • Banh Tet: New Year's cakes and their meanings [Vietnamese New Year traditions]. By Trinh Dang and Jennifer Michael, pp. 8-9
  • Cutoms of Vietnamese New Year, Tet Nguyen-Dan. By Cuong Nhu Pham, translated by Trinh Dang, pp. 10-11
  • A brief history of Chol Chhnam, Cambodian New Years celebrations in Philadelphia. By Leendavy Koung, pp. 12-14
  • News, p. 15

5:3 (Summer/fall 1992) Special exhibition issue. 16 pp. $4

  • Columbus, myth and 500 years of resistance and survival. By Bill Westerman and Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • Looking at photographs by Thomas B. Morton. By Cheryl McClenney-Brooker, Thora Jacobson and Debora Kodish, pp. 4-9
  • Photographer's statement. By Thomas B. Morton, pp. 10-11
  • From Angkor Wat to MTV: the handmade work of a Cambodian videographer. By Bill Westerman, pp. 12-13
  • The story of the greedy family. By Leendavy Koung, pp. 14-5
  • News, p. 15

5:2 (Spring 1992) 12 pp. $4

  • Truths of ODUNDE [community festival]. By Gerald L. Davis, pp. 2-3
  • "To put kind feeelings in the heart:" the paintings of Eang Mao [Khmer artist]. By William Westerman. pp. 4-5
  • The story of the wolf and the shrimp. Recorded and edited by Leendavy Koung, pp. 6-7
  • On folklore and multiculturalism. By Debora Kodish, pp. 8-9
  • News, pp. 10-11

5:1 (Winter 1992) 12 pp. $4

  • Translating the truth, translating the law: the case of Commonwealth v. Thuy. By Bill Westerman, pp. 2-3
  • Food isn't a meal unless rice is served: exploring Cambodian foodways. By Jennifer Michael, Leendavy Koung and Theany Sam, pp. 4-6
  • Gospel in and out of the African community. By John W. Roberts, pp. 6-7
  • Grants workshop and news about funding for last year's attendees, pp. 8-9
  • Publications, kudos and news, pp. 10-11

4:1 (Winter 1991) 12 pp. $4 OUT OF PRINT

  • "You can't take the country out of a man:" Furman Humphrey and the African American tradition of woodcarving. By Jack L. Lindsey, pp. 2-5
  • "Bamboo shoots grow up to be bamboo:" documenting Cambodian traditions. By Bill Westerman, pp. 6-7
  • Why people think folk arts are safe (and why they aren't). By Debora Kodish, pp. 8-9
  • Announcing a new artist aid program for traditional artists, p. 10
  • Upcoming events, p. 11

3:3 (Fall 1990) Passing on Traditions: Sixteen Master Folk Artists special exhibition issue. 12 pp. $4 OUT OF PRINT (view pdf / 5.7 MB)

  • Passing on traditions: sixteen master folk artists. By Debora Kodish, p. 2
  • Introduction: common ground and cultural diversity. By Debora Kodish and Catherine Jacobs, p. 3
  • Sharing a legacy
  • Learning is a lifelong process: Aguedo Beltran, p. 4 [Puerto Rican cuatro-maker]; Stolen threads: Eudokia Sorochaniuk, p. 4 [Ukranian Hutsul weaver]; "I will be responsible for his learning:" Nykola Pawliuk, p. 5 [Ukrainian hutsul leatherworker]; Searching out others: Judith Civan, p. 5 [English bobbin laceworker]
  • Refining and re-finding traditions
  • Maintaining a cultural art: Terrence Cameron, p. 6 [Trinidadian steel pan-maker]; Finding one's roots: John Roussos, p. 6 [Greek santouri musician];
  • Gathering regional traditions: Anna Halmay, Teofila Malnychuk and Stefania Shumsky Meyer, pp. 6-7 [Ukrainian embroidery and beadwork]; Weaving past into present: Elisabeth Jonsson Brown, p. 7 [Swedish weaver]
  • A matter of cultural survival
  • Treasured symbols: Bronius Krokys, p. 8 [Lithuanian folksong]; Overcoming obstacles: Peang Koung, p. 8-9 [Khmer musical instrument-maker]; Cultivating wisdom: Blanche Epps, p. 9 [African American gardener]; Fabrics of culture: Pang Xiong Sirirathasuk, p. 9-10 [Hmong needleworker]
  • Changing tides of appreciation
  • Preserving miniature theater: Hal Taylor, p. 10 [European marionette-maker]; Expanding expressive possibilities: LaVaughn Robinson, p. 10-11 [African American tap dancer]
  • Acknowledgements, p.11

3:2 (Summer 1990) 8 pp. $2

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • Apsaras in Philadelphia: keeping Khmer court dance alive. By Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • "We sang all the time:" reviving Lithuanian folksongs. By Debora Kodish, pp. 4-5, 7
  • News, p. 5-7
  • Myer Adler: adventures in creative recycling [about a Jewish dreydl and grogger-maker]. By Catherine Jacobs, pp. 6-7

3:1 (Winter 1989/90) 8 pp. $2

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • Folklore everywhere: Philadelphia Folklore Month a rousing success. pp. 2-3
  • Pennsylvania German folk arts: dowry, quilts and marriage gifts. By Jack L. Lindsey, pp. 4-5
  • African American holiday tradition in Philadelphia [Kwanzaa]. By Jerrilyn McGregory, pp. 5, 7
  • Events, pp. 6-7

2:3 (Summer 1989) 10 pp. $2

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • Topping out: "The tree symbolizes that we did it!" [ironworkers' occupational folklore]. By Debora Kodish, pp. 2-3
  • Far from Puerto Rico: decimas about the immigrant experience [about a song tradition]. By Joan Gross, pp. 4-5
  • Philadelphia Folklore Month. p. 5, 9
  • Roots and branches: the greening of urban Philadelphia [folk gardening]. By Jerrilyn McGregory, pp. 6-7
  • "Going to work:" 50 years of tap dancing in concert halls of Philadelphia [about LaVaughn Robinson]. By Carole Boughter, pp. 7-8
  • Philadelphia Folklore Project news, p. 9-10

2:2 (Winter 1989) 8 pp. $2

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • "How to do what can't be done:" Bobby Pandola's mummers' costumes. By Dorothy Noyes and Jan Greenberg, pp. 2-3
  • A master lawyer's legend: Cecil B. Moore in the Philadelphia criminal courts. By Samuel Schrager, pp. 4-5
  • Philadelphia Folklore Month, p. 5, 7
  • The life and times of a puppeteer [about Hal Taylor]. By Joan Gross, p. 6
  • Philadelphia Folklore Project news, p. 7, 8

2:1 (Fall 1988) 8 pp. $2 OUT OF PRINT

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • La princesa for a day: sweet sixteens in Philadelphia [about quinceañeras]. By Joan Gross, pp. 2-3
  • Passing on traditions [about an Italian American beadworker]. By Dorothy Noyes and Jan Greenberg, pp. 4-5
  • Philadelphia Folklore Month, p. 5, 7, 8
  • Beating the heat [about African American folk arts]. By Jerrilyn McGregory, p. 6
  • Philadelphia Folklore Project news, p. 7

1:2 (Spring 1988) 8 pp. $2 OUT OF PRINT

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • Survey of African American folklife. By Jerrilyn McGregory, pp. 2-3
  • Better homes and gardens: what the magazine won't tell you about Philadelphia landscapes. By Susan Levitas, pp. 4-5
  • About Italian plasterers, palms and artists. By Dorothy Noyes, p. 5
  • Cambodian and Laotian New Year's celebrations videotaped. By Joan Gross, pp. 6-7
  • Philadelphia Folklore Project news, pp. 7-8

1:1 (October 1987) 8 pp. $2

  • From the director. By Debora Kodish, p. 1
  • Research on Italian crafts traditions: a summary. By Dorothy Noyes, pp. 2-3
  • "Trying to learn the people:" the family business project. By Stephanie Kane, pp. 4-5
  • October update: survey of folklife resources. By Margaret Craig, p. 5
  • Looking towards October 1989: a month of folklore in Philadelphia, pp. 6-7